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Sam D’Amico, A Percussion lcon Passes

On October 22nd, the local percussion community lost a special friend, business owner and overall champion for drums and percussion throughout the entire tri-state area. Sam D’Amico passed away last week and in so doing, left all of us with a tremendous void in our hearts for his special combination of humor and business dealings with our entire percussion community. Sam had recently closed his South Philly business after proudly serving all drummers for over 33 years. Through good times and bad, Sam would always open his shop every day with a smile and plenty of time to give to his community of drummers…famous, or not.

A recent news article in the South Philly Review details some of the reason why Sam was so special to so many people.

All of us who had the pleasure of knowing Sam will dearly miss him and will certainly keep his entire family in our thoughts and prayers. Thank you Sam, for being devoted to your family…tens of thousands of customers included.

{ 6 comments… add one }
  • Tony Vigilante October 31, 2008, 2:10 pm

    Sam, you were one of the great gentlemen of the drumming community in Philly. Your warm personality was an example to all of your employees and they mirrored that same quality in your shop. You will be sorely missed. May you rest in peace.

  • Jimmy Cicchini December 24, 2008, 8:58 pm

    He was my first drum teacher and he taught me the foundation of drumming.He taught me the fundamental technique’s with great care and patience and that’s what got me through my career and I hold him in the highest of regards.He was like a Dad to me and gave me advice on all things through out my life.Anytime I walked into his store, no matter how busy he was or what he was doing he always asked me to come into his office to sit down and chat.I was treated to top notch service with great attention to my every need. I will miss him greatly!
    Rest easy my great friend Sam…you will always be remembered!

  • Joe January 18, 2009, 1:02 pm

    Very sorry to hear that. I was a huge Don Mclean fan back then (and still am). I bought my first guitar at Sam’s and had my first few years of lessons there. My teach was a man named Lou Iaccovelli. Lou had told me he was a great friend of Sam’s and I can believe it. Because that teacher would work me to death (especially in the summers when he knew I had no school to go to 😉 – but everything I know aboout the guitar today I owe to Lou and of course Sam. RIP Sam.

  • Dr. Mike Friedman January 24, 2009, 1:49 pm

    I only started playing drums about 1 1/2 years ago at the age of 40. I am glad I met Sam. He and his staff were very warm and took the time to educate me about drumming equipment. I was shocked and saddened to hear of Sam’s passing. Even though I only met him a few times, you knew you were speaking with a local icon, and a revered individual who touched so many lives. My thoughts and prayers go out his family and close friends.

  • Pete Zito, 3rd February 22, 2011, 5:35 pm

    Sam,
    You left me with a very big void in my life. It’s been more than two years since you went to that big band in the sky, but it feels to me like it was yesterday you and I were having our usual ( almost daily ) chats on the phone. All the “shits” we did together …how could I ever forget. You gave me so much tutelege and direction in my life….even at 64 years of age I still wish I had someone on my life again who could imbue me with the same wisdom you gave so unselfishly…..I have never found another who could equal you and I do so sorely miss the times of our lives we shared in the 40+ years we were like brothers……..keep that drum chair open for me up there…..I think my time is getting near too.
    Love always,
    Pete Zito, 3rd.

  • Aaron Wemer May 22, 2013, 7:04 am

    Wow, it clearly has been too long. I worked for Sam as a drum tech trainee back in 2006. I was an aspiring drummer in a couple local bands and he hired me on the spot the first time I entered the store to replace some old heads. Just straight up asked if I needed a job and I took it. He couldn’t pay much but I didn’t care as the atmosphere was so easy going and the employee discount was huge. I left a year later for a better paying gig and he told me that there’s always money to be made if you look in the right places and that he wanted me to stay to teach me the business so I’d leave with some new job skills. I foolishly declined the heart warming offer, and thinking back on that moment still makes me feel reflective. Sam was an incredibly warm-hearted guy who loved telling time-machine-like stories and giving back to his community. My heart is out to friends and family who feel his loss.

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